The Hindu, dated September 3, 2014

Musical greats celebrated in stamps
The Indian Express-Tribute to D.K. Pattammal

President Pranab Mukherjee released a set of eight commemorative postage stamps on musicians at a function in Rashtrapati Bhavan on Wednesday.

Pandit Ravi Shankar, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, D.K. Pattammal, Pandit Mallikarjun Mansur, Gangubai Hangal, Pandit Kumar Gandharva, Ustad Vilayat Khan and Ustad Ali Akbar Khan are featured.

The President said: “As we pay tribute to eight of the greatest music maestros of contemporary India, we celebrate their life and work and their matchless legacy. These eight maestros are, without a doubt, among the tallest luminaries in the history of world music who have not only achieved personal perfection but have made extraordinary contributions, in their respective fields, to the development and evolution of the schools of music in which their talents were nurtured and honed.”

Postage Stamp on DKP

President Pranab Mukherjee Wednesday released a set of commemorative postage stamps on eight Indian musicians, describing them among "the greatest music maestros of contemporary India".

The stamps feature luminaries in classical Indian music: Pandit Ravi Shankar, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, D.K. Pattammal, Pandit Mallikarjun Mansur, Gangubai Hangal, Pandit Kumar Gandharva, Ustad Vilayat Khan and Ustad Ali Akbar Khan.

"As we pay tribute to eight of the greatest music maestros of contemporary India, we celebrate their life and work and their matchless legacy," the president said at an event at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

"These eight maestros are, without a doubt, among the tallest luminaries in the history of world music.

"They have not only achieved personal perfection but have made extraordinary contributions, in their respective fields, to the development and evolution of the schools of music in which their talents were nurtured and honed.

"Their contribution and its enrichment of our cultural heritage cannot be quantified or estimated. It is infinite in its resonance and their names will be mentioned with great reverence.

"Their music will be cherished by the young and old, for many decades to come," the president added.

The Indian Express, Madras, dated August 22, 1987

Tribute to D.K. Pattammal
The Indian Express-Tribute to D.K. Pattammal

There was a special tribute to renowned carnatic vocalist D.K. Pattammal at the function torelease the Sathyamurthi centenary commemorative stamp.

It was Mrs. Pattammal who sang the invocation at the function and the significance of this was explained later by Mr. M.P. Sivagnanam.

Mr. Sivagnanam recalled the days when Sathyamurthi used to go on campaign tours or addressing public meetings for the Congress. And at each of the meetings there would be some person to sing songs before the start of the function.

During those days it was Mrs. Pattammal alone who braved the threats of repressive action, to sing at Sathyamurthi’s functions and other Congress meetings.

It was only fitting that the same Mrs. Pattammal should sing the invocation at this function also, he said.

The Hindustan Times, dated September 12, 1983

Carnatic music of vintage
The Hindustan Times-Carnatic music of vintage

Some forty years ago, D.K. Pattammal was a name to reckon with in the world of Carnatic music, especially among the serious minded. Listening to her recital at Kamani Hall, under the aegis of Grindlays Kala Sangam, reinforced that image; what is more, it established her as a musician’s musician.

The merit of Pattammal’s music is indeed earnestness – the kind which belongs to self-effacing devotion. To her the composer and his musical conception remain supreme in importance, herself – the singer – being a medium. The result is that her rendering of a kriti is rich in lyrical and melodic value; for, she captures the bhava of the poet – a prescription for aesthetics laid down by Bharata. Dikshitar’s “Tyagaraja” in Anandabhairavi is an instance. Even the young composer Srivatsan, whose Sanskrit song she rendered, could not have asked for a more charming exposition. Pattammal’s composed, unhurried style is an object lesson for the young artists.

The link with the coming generation was seen in the Meera Narayanan, the violinist who accompanied the singer. Meera’s confident manner and polished style mark her clearly as a violinist with a future.

By
K. S. Srinivasan




Pattammal shines in classical Kritis
Pattammal-shines-in-classical-Kritis

The Shanmukhananda Fine Arts and Sangeetha Sabha presented on Saturday evening, the noted vocalist D.K. Pattammal in a Carnatic music recital.

It has been quite sometime since the Carnatic music fans of Bombay had an opportunity to hear Pattammal, whose performance amply fulfilled the expectations of all who came to hear her.

The word serene can be used to describe the total effect of the performance. Pattammal’s repertoire consisted of choice selections of Thyagaraja and Dikshitar kritis and towards the end, some very beautiful Tamil tukkadas.

The rendering of the various kritis was in Pattammal’s inimitable chaste style moulded in the most classical traditions emphasising the very basic raga-thana-bhava.

The leisurely manner of singing with a very clear enunciation of the words may, perhaps, lack tempo and sparkle but this was more than compensated, by an inner flow of sublimity.

It is different to single out any particular kriti for individual mention – “Mansa Guru Mukha” in Anandabhairavi, “Emi Jesithe Nemi” in Thodi and “Tholi Janmamu” in Bilahari were all examples of musical excellence.

The alapanas in Thodi and Anandabhairavi centered on their respective jiva-swaras and there was not a single touch that did not have the characteristic raga lakshana. The alapanas could have perhaps been a little more elaborate. The swarams were in themselves miniatures of the ragas.

The accompaniment by Thiruparkadal Veera Raghavan on the violin was adequate.

The brilliant thani avarthanam of Palghat Mani Iyer on the mridangam was enchanting; every performance of his is a thrilling experience for his listeners. The infinite variety of rhythms he produces with those magical fingers is an absolute marvel.

The Hindu, dated December 27, 1985

Music Academy Festival

Weight and Wisdom

Listening to D.K. Pattammal was like being inside a temple after a lot of empty shopping outside it. Despite her infirmity, she could still present Carnatic music with its weight and wisdom. The unshakable Kalapramana and firm definition of her music and the emotive colour of her tone enabled her to provide deep experience of great devotional pieces like “Dasarathe Nandana” (Asaveri) and “Ekkalathilum Maravene” (Nattakurinji). The Sanskrit song of Srivatsan “Trahirnam Trayambake Gowri” was a surprise. This well structured piece with striking sahitya sequencing in the third movement was presented admirably by Pattammal after a solid and satisfying alapana of Dhanyasi. T. Rukmini (Violin) contributed a captivating Harikambhoji. T.A.S. Mani’s mridangam support was exceedingly good.

Musings on Music

Pattammal & Mani give pleasing recital
Musing-on-Music

When an unrivalled master of Mridangam like Palghat Mani Iyer, who has revelled and grappled with the high and mighty of the music world and who is allergy to play with the opposite sex is well-known, does the seemingly impossible by reversifying his stand. He should inevitably be the centre of focus at such a concert.

It is also natural that while the dictates of tradition subordinate his play to the needs of the vocalist, an unconscious urge propels him to take the lead-with the others including the vocalist trailing behind. This should in the usual course have happened at the Malleswaram Sangeetha Sabha when he accompanied D.K. Pattammal in her Karnatic Vocal concert. But it is to the credit of Pattammal that she received those rhythmic broadsides and barrages with a cool assurance and did not allow a heavy tilt in favour of the percussion.

It is true despite an overall serenity and the tightness of her rhythm, Pattammal’s singing was short of melody, the warm limpid tone that has been cherished by the music lovers throughout the years was in short supply. It was somewhat dry but was able to underline the stateliness of classical art clearly while her imaginative and bold excusions in the regions of rhythm made the recital uniformly enjoyable.

GUSTOFUL

This aspect was best exemplified in her elaboration of Sankarabharanam.. Her alapana was reposeful and brought out the salient motives of the raga clearly. But when she followed with the classic – Eduta Nilichite of Tyagaraja, the combined effort with Mani Iyer also joining, invested the song with a new dimension, The Mridangam was eloquent and gustoful and more often covered up the vocalist.

Pattammal’s improvisations and Swaraprasthara in Sankarabharanam and Todi in “Daachu Kovalena”, and the Pallavi in Pantuvarali in Chapu Tala were done with an ease and aplomb made her share the honours with the Mridangist. Her remarkable grip over rhythm and her elongation of phrases, cross-cutting trough rhythmic cylces made her singing very arresting.

D.K. Jayaraman supported her in singing with a warmer voice. But in addition, he sang with a feeling and gave some enjoyable moments in Kapi and Suruti.

T. Veeraraghavan played on the Violin in quieter key, but filling up those tuneful touches and nuances that were short in the vocalists. S. Seshagiridas on the Khanjira was gustoful and guarded in play. He was bypassed in the first solo round of percussion but allowed to participate in the second round when he certainly proved his mettle.

By
Murali